bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: N O S A J J M A M F J
2013: D N

 
  Other news for:
Surgery
 Resources from HONselect
Common Irregular Heartbeat May Pose Risks for Surgery Patients
People with atrial fibrillation have higher odds for stroke after an operation, study finds

By Robert Preidt

TUESDAY, Aug. 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Surgery patients who have the irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation may be at heightened risk of stroke for months after their operation, a new study finds.

Atrial fibrillation affects more than 33 million people worldwide, and doctors have long known that people with the heart rhythm disorder have a three-fold higher risk of stroke.

The new study looked at risks occurring around the time of a surgery, however. The researchers analyzed data from 1.7 million patients in California who had inpatient surgery between 2007 and 2011 and were followed for an average of just over two years.

Of those patients, more than 24,700, or close to 1.5 percent, experienced atrial fibrillation around the time of surgery.

Overall, nearly 14,000 of the patients later suffered an ischemic stroke, which is caused by blocked blood flow to the brain.

According to the researchers, having atrial fibrillation around the time of surgery was tied to a doubling of stroke risk after non-cardiac surgery, and a 30 percent higher risk of stroke after cardiac surgery.

Researchers led by Dr. Gino Gialdini, of Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City, believe the findings may be important for the care of people undergoing surgery, especially for those having operations that are not related to cardiological issues.

Further research is needed to learn more about the link between atrial fibrillation around the time of surgery and increased stroke risk, and the best ways to prevent stroke in these patients, they added.

One expert said the study provides valuable new information.

"This large study suggests that atrial fibrillation occurring during this time may be significant and associated with a real increase in long-term risk of stroke, especially in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery," said Dr. Nicholas Skipitaris, director of cardiac electrophysiology and The Heart Rhythm Center at Lenox Hill Heart and Vascular Institute in New York City.

He said the study "has major implications, as patients with [atrial fibrillation] likely warrant closer rhythm monitoring and consideration for anticoagulation to attenuate [lessen] their risk for stroke in the future."

The study will be published in the Aug. 13 issue of Journal of the American Medical Association.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about atrial fibrillation.

SOURCES: Nicholas Skipitaris, M.D., director, cardiac electrophysiology and The Heart Rhythm Center, Lenox Hill Heart and Vascular Institute, New York City; Journal of the American Medical Association, news release, Aug. 12, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=690614

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Risk
Atrial Fibrillation
Heart
Research Personnel
Association
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact