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Choose Wrinkle Treatments Wisely, FDA Advises
Scarring, allergic reactions and vision problems among possible side effects

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, Aug. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Injectable dermal fillers are widely used by people seeking to smooth out wrinkles, but it's important to know the risks of these products before using them, a U.S. government expert says.

Dermal fillers use a variety of materials to treat facial wrinkles. Most of these products are temporary and last for about six months or more. Only one permanent wrinkle filler is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Dermal fillers are not approved for use anywhere else but on the face.

"As with any medical procedure, being injected with dermal fillers poses some risks. You should ask what you can expect and contact your health care professional if you are concerned about a particular side effect," Dr. Janette Alexander, an FDA medical officer, said in an agency news release.

Common side effects include bruising, redness, swelling, pain and itching. Other side effects can include infections, lumps and bumps, discoloration or a change in pigmentation. Rare, but serious, risks include scarring, blurred vision, partial vision loss, blindness and severe allergic reactions (anaphylactic shock).

Most side effects occur shortly after a dermal filler is injected and vanish within two weeks, according to Alexander. She said you should not use wrinkle fillers if you have:

  • Severe allergies marked by a history of anaphylactic shock
  • An allergy to collagen (if you want to use a filler containing collagen)
  • An allergy to lidocaine (if you planned on using a filler with lidocaine)
  • A tendency to form excessive scarring or thick scarring
  • A bleeding disorder
  • An active inflammatory condition -- such as cysts, pimples, rashes or hives -- or an infection. In such cases you should postpone treatment until the condition is controlled.

Alexander also noted that the safety of dermal fillers is unknown when used in pregnant or breast-feeding women, in people younger than 18 or when used with Botox and other wrinkle treatments.

She also warned to never buy dermal fillers on the Internet. They could be fake, contaminated and/or dangerous.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Aging has more about aging and skin care.

SOURCE: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, news release, Aug. 5, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=690536

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Therapeutics
Hypersensitivity
Risk
Infection
Lidocaine
Anaphylaxis
Skin Care
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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