bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: O S A J J M A M F J
2013: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Child
Parenting
 Resources from HONselect
Parent's Death May Raise Risk of Early Death for Grown Children, Study Suggests
Odds of dying prematurely 50 percent higher in adults who'd lost a parent in childhood, researchers report

By Robert Preidt

WEDNESDAY, July 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Children and teens who lose a parent might face an increased risk of an early death in adulthood, a new study suggests.

People who were children or teens when a parent died had a 50 percent greater risk of death during the study period than those who had not experienced the death of a parent, according to the report.

Although the study found an association between a parent's death and a child's later risk of premature death, it wasn't designed to prove cause-and-effect.

Also, the increased risk of premature death among these people may be due to both genetic factors and the long-term effects of a parent's death on the health and social well-being of a child, researcher Jiong Li and colleagues at Aarhus University in Denmark theorized.

The study findings were published in the July 22 issue of the journal PLoS Medicine.

The team analyzed data on children born in Denmark, Finland and Sweden between 1968 and 2008. Nearly 190,000 children were between 6 months and 18 years when one of their parents died. During a follow-up period ranging from one to 40 years, almost 40,000 of those people died.

The increased risk of early death persisted into early adulthood, no matter how old a child was when a parent died. The researchers also found that the increased risk of death was higher among children whose parents died from unnatural causes rather than natural causes (84 percent vs. 33 percent). The risk of death was highest among children of parents who committed suicide, according to a journal news release.

The researchers said their findings show the need for health and social support for children and teens who have lost a parent, and added that this support may be necessary for a long time.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics explains how to help children cope with death.

SOURCE: PLoS Medicine, news release, July 22, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=689914

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Death
Parents
Risk
Research Personnel
Adult
Association
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact