bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
All Web sites
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: O S A J J M A M F J
2013: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Antibiotics
Hospices
 Resources from HONselect
Antibiotics Often Prescribed Needlessly for Terminally Ill, Study Finds
Overuse of these drugs in hospice patients raises concerns about side effects, other issues

By Robert Preidt

WEDNESDAY, July 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotics are given to many hospice patients, although there's little proof the medicines benefit them, a new study shows.

About 21 percent of patients who go directly from hospitals to hospice care for the terminally ill leave the hospital with an antibiotic prescription, even though more than one-quarter didn't have an infection while in the hospital, the researchers found.

Also, 27 percent of hospice patients are still taking antibiotics in their final week of life, according to the study published online recently in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

The extensive use of antibiotics in hospice patients raises concerns because the underlying goal of hospice care is to control pain and protect quality of life without aggressive medical treatment.

Risks of antibiotic use include harmful side effects, a lengthening of the dying process and the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

The "frequency and prevalence of antibiotic use in this patient population is a concern," study author Jon Furuno, an associate professor in the Oregon State University/Oregon Health and Science University College of Pharmacy, said in a university news release.

"Antibiotics themselves can have serious side effects that sometimes cause new problems, a factor that often isn't adequately considered. And in terminally ill people they may or may not work anyway," he said.

In the United States, Medicare covers hospice care for patients expected to live fewer than six months. Unnecessary and improper use of antibiotics in all areas of health care is a major concern.

Due to the design of the study, it likely underestimates the level of antibiotic use among hospice patients, the researchers said.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about hospice care.

SOURCE: Oregon State University, news release, July 14, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=689775

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Terminally Ill
Hospice Care
Research Personnel
Infection
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact