bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
All Web sites
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: A J J M A M F J
2013: D N O S A

 
  Other news for:
Genetics
Mental Health
 Resources from HONselect
Your Genes May Help Pick Your Friends
Study says DNA between close friends is as similar as that between 4th cousins

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, July 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A person's DNA may play a big role in who they decide to hang with, a new study suggests.

"Looking across the whole genome, we find that, on average, we are genetically similar to our friends," study co-author James Fowler, a professor of medical genetics and political science at the University of California, San Diego, said in a university news release.

"We have more DNA in common with the people we pick as friends than we do with strangers in the same population," he said.

In the study, Fowler's team analyzed the genes of more than 1,900 people who were either pairs of unrelated friends or unrelated strangers.

He and his colleagues found that friends share about one percent of their genes and are as much "related" as fourth cousins or people who share great-great-great grandparents.

"One percent may not sound like much to the layperson, but to geneticists it is a significant number," study co-author Nicholas Christakis, a professor of sociology, evolutionary biology and medicine at Yale University, said in the news release.

"And how remarkable: Most people don't even know who their fourth cousins are! Yet we are somehow, among a myriad of possibilities, managing to select as friends the people who resemble our kin," he added.

The researchers also developed what they call a "friendship score" that can be used to predict who will be friends. It's about as accurate as genetic-based methods of predicting a person's risk of obesity or schizophrenia.

The study was published July 14 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

More information

Mental Health America explains the importance of connecting with others.

SOURCE: University of California, San Diego, news release, July 14, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=689714

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
DNA
Mental Health
Sociology
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact