bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: O S A J J M A M F J
2013: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Insulin
Obesity
Mental Health
Stress
 Resources from HONselect
Stress May Leave You Heading to the Cookie Jar
Worried women could be prone to weight gain, study suggests

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, July 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Stress can slow a woman's metabolism and lead to weight gain, new research suggests.

The study included 58 women, average age 53, who were asked about their stress levels the previous day and then given a meal than included 930 calories and 60 grams of fat. The Ohio State University researchers measured how long it took the women to burn off those calories and fat.

On average, women who had one or more stressful events during the previous 24 hours burned 104 fewer calories in the seven hours after eating the meal than those who were stress-free.

On a daily basis, that difference could add up to a weight gain of nearly 11 pounds a year, the researchers said.

The stressed women also had higher levels of the hormone insulin, which contributes to the storage of fat, according to the study, published in the latest issue of the journal Biological Psychiatry.

The findings show that "over time, stressors could lead to weight gain," study lead author Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, a professor of psychiatry and psychology, said in a university news release.

"We know from other data that we're more likely to eat the wrong foods when we're stressed, and our data say that when we eat the wrong foods, weight gain becomes more likely because we are burning fewer calories," she said.

Previous studies have found that people who are under stress or have other mood problems are at increased risk for becoming overweight or obese. The new findings suggest one reason for that possible connection, Kiecolt-Glaser and her colleagues said.

"We know we can't always avoid stressors in our life, but one thing we can do to prepare for that is to have healthy food choices in our refrigerators and cabinets so that when those stressors come up, we can reach for something healthy rather than going to a very convenient but high-fat choice," study co-author Martha Belury, a professor of human nutrition, said in the news release.

The study suggested a connection between stress and weight gain, but it did not prove such a link exists.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention explains how to prevent weight gain.

SOURCE: Ohio State University, news release, July 14, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=689685

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Women
Lead
Research Personnel
Psychiatry
Mental Health
Burns
Affect
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact