bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: N O S A J J M A M F J
2013: D N

 
  Other news for:
Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Depression
Mental Health
 Resources from HONselect
Depression May Make It Harder to Beat Prostate Cancer
Men with both conditions have worse survival odds, study contends

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, July 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate cancer patients are more likely to be diagnosed with aggressive disease, receive less effective treatment and die sooner if they also have depression, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 41,200 American men who were diagnosed with localized prostate cancer between 2004 and 2007. They followed them through 2009. Nearly 1,900 of the patients had been diagnosed with depression in the two years before their prostate cancer was discovered.

"Men with intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer and a recent diagnosis of depression are less likely to undergo definitive treatment and experience worse overall survival," study lead author Dr. Jim Hu, a professor of urology at the University of California, Los Angeles, said in a university news release.

"The effect of depressive disorders on prostate cancer treatment and survivorship warrants further study, because both conditions are relatively common in men in the United States," he added. While the study found an association between the two, it did not establish a direct cause-and-effect relationship.

Several factors may contribute to this association, the researchers said. They include: bias against people with mental illness; depression's effect on the cancer's biological processes; a depressed patient's reduced interest in his health or treatment; and missed opportunities by doctors to educate men about prostate cancer screening and treatment.

Depression was more likely in prostate cancer patients who were older, had lower incomes, were white or Hispanic, were unmarried, had other health problems and did not live in cities, the researchers found.

Also, depressed prostate cancer patients were less likely to ask for treatments such as surgery or radiation than those without depression, according to the study published online recently in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

"This was surprising, because depressed men were more likely to see physicians in the two years prior to prostate cancer diagnosis compared to non-depressed men," Hu said.

Next to skin cancer, prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in American men. About 233,000 U.S. men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2014, and nearly 30,000 will die of the disease, according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about prostate cancer.

SOURCE: University of California, Los Angeles, news release, July 10, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=689679

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Prostate
Depression
Men
Therapeutics
Research Personnel
Association
Diagnosis
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact