bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
All Web sites
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: S A J J M A M F J
2013: D N O S

 
  Other news for:
Coronary Disease
 Resources from HONselect
Poor More Prone to Leg Circulation Trouble
Focus is needed on treatment and education about condition that limits leg circulation, researchers say

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, July 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People with the lowest incomes may have a higher risk for a circulatory condition called peripheral artery disease (PAD), a new study suggests.

People with PAD have narrowing of the arteries that supply blood to the limbs, most often the legs. The condition causes leg pain and is often an indicator of narrowing of the arteries throughout the body. People with PAD have a higher risk for heart disease and stroke.

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 6,800 people with PAD who took part in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999 to 2004. They found that those with low incomes were significantly more likely to have the disease.

People with the lowest income levels were more than twice as likely to have PAD as those with the highest income and education levels, according to the study published online recently in the journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

"Our finding highlights the need to focus on education and advocacy efforts for these at-risk populations," study co-author Dr. Reena Pande, an associate physician in the cardiovascular division at Brigham and Women's Hospital, said in a journal news release.

"We need dedicated approaches to PAD awareness efforts, research endeavors and treatment strategies that focus on those individuals of low socioeconomic strata who may be most likely to be affected by PAD," Pande said.

While researchers found an association between socioeconomic levels and PAD, the study did not prove cause-and-effect.

Treatments for PAD include changes in lifestyle, such as quitting smoking, eating a healthful diet and exercising regularly. Some people may need a procedure that restores blood flow to the legs.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about peripheral artery disease.

SOURCE: Brigham and Women's Hospital, news release, July 2, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=689500

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Arteries
Therapeutics
Research Personnel
Blood
Risk
Women
Smoking
Association
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact