bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
All Web sites
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: A J J M A M F J
2013: D N O S A

 
  Other news for:
Anxiety
Brain
Child Development
Child
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Mental Health
 Resources from HONselect
Anxiety May Affect Kids' Brains
MRIs show larger 'fear center' in those who are more anxious

By Robert Preidt

TUESDAY, June 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Children with anxiety problems actually have a bigger "fear center" in their brain, researchers report.

The study included 76 children aged 7 to 9, which is when anxiety-related traits and symptoms can first be reliably detected, according to the Stanford University School of Medicine researchers.

The parents provided information about their youngsters' anxiety levels, and the children also underwent MRI scans of their brain structure and function.

The investigators focused on an area of the brain called the amygdala, which is a person's "fear center," and found that kids with high anxiety levels had a larger amygdala compared to children with low anxiety levels. This part of the brain, the researchers noted, had more connections to other brain regions involved in attention, emotion perception and regulation.

The researchers also developed a way to predict children's anxiety levels based on brain scan measurements of amygdala size and its level of connection to other brain areas, according to the study in the June issue of the journal Biological Psychiatry.

"It is a bit surprising that alterations to the structure and connectivity of the amygdala were so significant in children with higher levels of anxiety, given both the young age of the children and the fact that their anxiety levels were too low to be observed clinically," first author Dr. Shaozheng Qin said in a journal news release.

The study is an important advance in identifying young children at risk for anxiety disorders and improves understanding of how anxiety develops in people, according to Qin.

While the study found an association between reported levels of anxiety and the structure and connectivity of the amygdala in kids, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

More information

The American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry has more about children and anxiety.

SOURCE: Biological Psychiatry, news release, June 16, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=688884

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Anxiety
Brain
Affect
Research Personnel
Psychiatry
Fear
Biological Psychiatry
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Mental Health
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact