bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: D N O S A J J M A M F J
2013: D

 
  Other news for:
Diabetes Mellitus
Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent
 Resources from HONselect
Scientists Reverse Type 1 Diabetes in Mice
Finding might lead one day to new ways to treat humans with blood sugar disease, researchers say

By Robert Preidt

SATURDAY, June 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists who reversed type 1 diabetes in mice say their results might lead one day to new ways to help people with the blood sugar disease.

Type 1 diabetes accounts for about 5 percent of all diabetes cases and is typically diagnosed in children and young adults. There is no cure for the disease, but it can be controlled by taking insulin.

In type 1 diabetes, immune system T-cells attack insulin-producing beta cells. In this study, University of Cincinnati researchers found that using an antibody called UT18 to stimulate a molecule called TLR4 prevented T-cells from attacking beta cells.

This approach reversed type 1 diabetes in a large percentage of non-obese mice that had just developed the disease, according to the study, which was to be presented Saturday at an American Diabetes Association meeting in San Francisco. Research presented at meetings has not been subjected to the peer-review process that most medical journals use, so it should be viewed as preliminary.

The key to reversing type 1 diabetes in mice is to catch the disease when it first develops, study leader Dr. William Ridgway said. He noted that the window of opportunity for treatment would be longer in humans, but would still be relatively brief. However, animal research findings often do not pan out in human trials.

This approach is different from most attempts to combat type 1 diabetes in that it does not directly target T-cells, according to Ridgway.

He said the therapy holds promise because one drug has already been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and others are under development.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about type 1 diabetes.

SOURCE: University of Cincinnati, news release, June 14, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=688750

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
T-Lymphocytes
Lead
Blood
Research Personnel
Cells
Adult
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact