bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
All Web sites
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: J J M A M F J
2013: D N O S A J

 
  Other news for:
Eye Diseases
 Resources from HONselect
Eye Doctors Offer Fireworks Safety Tips
But they caution that displays are best left to professionals

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, July 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- If you and your family like fireworks, the best way to enjoy them is by watching displays staged by professionals, according to eye doctors.

In 2012, about 8,700 Americans were injured by fireworks, and more than 1,000 of those cases involved eye injuries, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Most of the fireworks-related injuries occurred in the 30-day period before and after the Fourth of July.

While you may be tempted to put on your own show, it's "better to just leave the fireworks alone and go to a show ... and let the professionals do it. That's the safest thing," Dr. Jay McCollum, an ophthalmologist and director of emergency services at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Callahan Eye Hospital, said in a university news release.

Dr. Priscilla Fowler, an assistant professor in the university's ophthalmology department and director of the cornea service, agrees. "Being a cornea specialist, I've seen too many injuries related to fireworks," she said in the news release. "And many of these occur in children and innocent bystanders and result in permanent vision loss."

If you decide to have fireworks at home anyway, the doctors offered a number of tips to reduce the risk of injury, burns and eye damage.

  • Read and follow all manufacturer's instructions. Do not use fireworks that have no instructions or product labels. These fireworks may have been made illegally and may be unsafe.
  • Light fireworks on a clean, flat surface away from the house or flammable materials.
  • Light only one item at a time. Never try to re-light fireworks that did not ignite or explode the first time.
  • Keep a bucket of water or a fire extinguisher present in case of fire.
  • Never throw fireworks at other people, carry fireworks in your pocket, shoot fireworks from metal or glass containers, experiment with or modify fireworks, make your own fireworks, or use bottle rockets.
  • Never allow children to play with fireworks, even sparklers. Sparklers can reach 1,800 degrees F, which is hot enough to melt gold.
  • In the event of an eye injury, do not touch, rub or press on the injured eye. Seek immediate medical care.

More information

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission has more about fireworks.

SOURCE: University of Alabama at Birmingham, news release, June 6, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=688671

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Eye
Wounds and Injuries
Cornea
Burns
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact