bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: D N O S A J J M A M F J
2013: D

 
  Other news for:
Child Development
Labor
Genetics
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
 Resources from HONselect
Scientists Spot Clues to Why Males Have Tougher Time in the Womb
Girls grow more slowly, placenta more protective, researchers say

By Randy Dotinga

FRIDAY, May 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Why do male babies have a tougher time in the womb than their female counterparts?

A new study suggests that the placenta -- the organ that connects the developing fetus to the mother and provides nourishment in the womb -- plays a major role in creating differences that go beyond the obvious physical differences between the genders.

"Our research has found that there are undeniable genetic and physiological differences between boys and girls that extend beyond just the development of their sexual characteristics," study co-author Claire Roberts, leader of the fetal growth research priority for the University of Adelaide's Robinson Research Institute in Australia, said in an university news release.

"We've known for some time that girls are clearly winning in the battle for survival, with markedly better outcomes for female babies for preterm birth, stillbirth, neonatal death and other complications after birth, such as macrosomia [a baby that weighs more than 8 pounds 13 ounces at birth]," Roberts said. "Male babies generally grow faster and bigger than females. This occurs in both the animal and human worlds, but until now we haven't really understood how or why."

In the new study, researchers found that genes produced by the placenta are different in males and females.

"We found that with female babies, there is much higher expression of genes involved in placental development, the maintenance of pregnancy and maternal immune tolerance," study co-author Sam Buckberry, a graduate student at Adelaide, said in the news release.

Roberts pointed out that "these findings may be important to help guide future sex-specific therapeutics [treatments] for pregnant women and for babies in the neonatal nursery."

The study is published in the May 27 online issue of the journal Molecular Human Reproduction.

More information

For more about fetal development, try the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCE: University of Adelaide, news release, May 27, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=688233

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Therapeutics
Research Personnel
Mothers
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact