bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
All Web sites
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: O S A J J M A M F J
2013: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Smoking Cessation
Smoking
 Resources from HONselect
Hookahs Not a Safe Alternative to Cigarettes, Study Shows
Water pipes still increased levels of nicotine, harmful substances in smokers

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, May 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People who smoke hookahs inhale significant amounts of nicotine and compounds that can cause cancer, heart disease and other health problems, a new study shows.

"Water pipe smoking is generally perceived to be a safe alternative to cigarette smoking, even for children and youths. Our study shows that water pipe use, particularly chronic use, is not risk-free," said study author Gideon St. Helen. He is a postdoctoral fellow in the division of clinical pharmacology and the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at the University of California, San Francisco.

The study included 55 men and women, aged 18 to 48, who were regular hookah smokers. The participants were asked to avoid any type of smoking for one week, and provided a urine sample at the end of that week. They then spent an evening smoking hookahs.

During that evening, the study volunteers spent an average of 74 minutes smoking hookahs and smoked an average of 0.6 bowls of hookah tobacco per person. They provided another urine sample after the hookah smoking session.

Compared to the urine samples collected after a week of not smoking, the urine sample collected after the evening of hookah smoking had: 73 times higher nicotine levels; four times higher levels of cotinine; two times higher levels of NNAL, a breakdown product of a tobacco-specific chemical called NNK, which can cause lung and pancreatic cancers; and 14 percent to 91 percent higher levels of breakdown products of volatile organic compounds such as benzene and acrolein, which are known to cause cancer, heart and lung diseases.

The study was published May 16 in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

The large increase in nicotine levels "raises concerns about the potential addictiveness of water pipe smoking and possible effects on the developing brains of children and youths who use water pipes," St. Helen said in a journal news release. "I have seen entire families, including young children, smoking water pipes," he added.

"Our study provides evidence that water pipe smoking leads to significant intake of tobacco-related addictive and harmful substances, and is therefore not without risk, particularly among children and youths," St. Helen concluded.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about hookahs.

SOURCE: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, news release, May 16, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=687778

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Smoking
Water
Urine
Neoplasms
Nicotine
Heart
Lung
Smoking Cessation
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact