bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
All Web sites
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: J J M A M F J
2013: D N O S A J

 
  Other news for:
Autistic Disorder
Child Development
 Resources from HONselect
Autism Affects Motor Skills Too
As condition's severity rises, so do difficulties in movement, dexterity, study finds

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, April 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Autism affects the development of motor skills in infants and toddlers, and the more severe their disorder, the slower their progress in being able to do things such as grasp objects and move around.

That's the finding of a study that assessed more than 150 children between the ages of 12 and 33 months. One hundred and ten youngsters in the study had autism, and 49 children didn't have the disorder. The children with autism were nearly a year behind typical children in fine motor skills, such as holding a spoon or a small toy.

The youngsters with autism were also about six months behind in gross motor skills, such as running and jumping, according to the study published in the April issue of the journal Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly.

The lag in motor skills development among the children with autism was not linked to intellectual ability, noted study author Megan MacDonald, an assistant professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University.

"It's not that big a deal if we're talking about older kids, but for kids between 1 and 3 years old, those are substantial deficits, almost one-third of their life," she said in a university news release. "At that age, they're like little sponges -- we can teach them motor skills," she added.

Plus, early identification of motor skills problems in autistic children "gives us more time to help children catch up to their peers in regards to motor skills," MacDonald said.

The findings show that motor skills development should be included in treatment programs for autistic children, said MacDonald, an expert on autistic children's movement skills. Treatment plans for autistic children typically focus on social communication.

Parents of children with autism should consider adaptive physical education programs, which are tailored to a child's abilities and needs, MacDonald said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more about autism.

SOURCE: Oregon State University, news release, April 24, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=687161

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Autistic Disorder
Motor Skills
Affect
Therapeutics
Aptitude
Motor Activity
Identification (Psychology)
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact