bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
All Web sites
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: J J M A M F J
2013: D N O S A J

 
  Other news for:
Physicians
Child
 Resources from HONselect
Pediatricians Should Plan for Anthrax Attack, U.S. Experts Say
Children may need special treatment in wake of bioterrorism

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, April 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Children may require different treatment than adults after exposure to anthrax, says a new report from leading U.S. pediatricians and health officials.

Because of the danger posed by anthrax -- a potential bioterrorism weapon -- pediatricians need to be knowledgeable and prepared in order to minimize illness and death in the event of an anthrax release, says the report from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Anthrax, an infectious disease caused by Bacillus anthracis bacteria, can cause thousands of infections with a high death rate if not quickly recognized and treated.

It's important that diagnosis and management of children with potential anthrax infection is handled by their pediatricians and others who normally provide them with health care, said the report, published online April 28 in the journal Pediatrics.

Public health officials will provide antibiotics for infants and children exposed to airborne anthrax spores during a bioterror attack. If started within 72 hours of exposure, antibiotics can prevent disease, the authors explained.

Anthrax can enter the body through cuts and other openings in the skin, by breathing it in, or through the gastrointestinal tract. The health experts said all forms of entry can lead to systemic infection, which is generally not contagious. In these cases, standard precautions should be taken in routine patient care, they advised.

Along with treating patients, pediatricians have an important role in helping families understand and comply with treatments, the authors added.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about anthrax.

SOURCE: American Academy of Pediatrics, news release, April 28, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=687062

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Anthrax
Infection
Therapeutics
Death
Adult
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact