bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
All Web sites
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: A J J M A M F J
2013: D N O S A

 
  Other news for:
Obesity
Weight Loss
 Resources from HONselect
Severe Obesity in Teens Tied to Possible Kidney Problems
Study looked at young patients planning to undergo weight-loss surgery

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, April 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one-fifth of severely obese teens have poor kidney function, a small new study suggests.

The study included 242 severely obese teens taking part in research on weight-loss surgery.

Seventeen percent of the teens had protein in their urine, which is an early sign of kidney damage. In addition, 7 percent had indications that their kidneys were working too hard, and 3 percent showed evidence of progressive loss of kidney function, the findings revealed.

Girls were more likely than boys to have protein in their urine, while those with the highest body-mass index scores (BMI) -- an estimate of body fat based on height and weight -- and those with reduced insulin sensitivity were more likely to show signs of progressive loss of kidney function.

The study, scheduled for presentation Friday at a National Kidney Foundation meeting in Las Vegas, is believed to be the first to examine kidney function in a large group of severely obese teens.

"We plan to continue following them up after [weight-loss] surgery procedures. It will be very important to see whether their kidney function improves after surgical weight loss," study author Dr. Nianzhou Xiao, of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, said in a kidney foundation news release.

Because this study was presented at a medical meeting, the data and conclusions should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

"Severe obesity is increasing and now affects 4 percent to 6 percent of U.S. children and adolescents," Dr. Beth Piraino, president of the National Kidney Foundation, said in the news release. "If untreated, obesity during adolescence is associated with a higher prevalence of chronic kidney disease and other serious conditions in adulthood, making obesity a huge public health burden," she added.

"This study indicates that kidney dysfunction is present in childhood obesity along with such complications as high blood pressure or diabetes. Lifestyle changes such as increased physical activity and healthy eating are critical to improving the overall health of the American population and need to start with our youth," Piraino noted.

Although the study found a connection between severe obesity and signs of kidney problems in teens, it did not establish a cause-and-effect relationship.

More information

The U.S. National Kidney Disease Education Program explains how to keep your kidneys healthy.

SOURCE: National Kidney Foundation, news release, April 25, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=686997

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Kidney
Urine
Kidney Diseases
Affect
Motor Activity
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact