bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
All Web sites
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: S A J J M A M F J
2013: D N O S

 
  Other news for:
Antibiotics
Environment
Food
Genetics
 Resources from HONselect
Could Cow Fertilizer Help Spread Antibiotic Resistance?
Researchers found high levels of genes for drug resistance in manure from dairy cattle

By Robert Preidt

TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Manure from dairy cows contains a surprisingly high number of antibiotic resistance genes from the animals' gut bacteria, a new study shows.

This is important because manure from cows is widely used as a farm soil fertilizer, and antibiotic resistance genes could be transferred to bacteria in soil used to grow food. The genes potentially could then move from bacteria on the food to people, the researchers explained.

For the study, the investigators analyzed manure samples from dairy cows and identified 80 unique antibiotic resistance genes that made a laboratory strain of E. coli resistant to four types of antibiotics.

About three-quarters of these 80 genes were only distantly related to previously identified antibiotic resistance genes. The researchers also discovered an entire new family of antibiotic resistance genes that thwart chloramphenicol antibiotics used to treat respiratory infections in livestock.

The study was published April 22 in the online journal mBio.

"The diversity of genes we found is remarkable in itself considering the small set of five manure samples," senior author Jo Handelsman, a Yale University microbiologist and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute professor, said in a news release from the American Society for Microbiology.

"But also, these are evolutionarily distant from the genes we already have in the genetic databases, which largely represent [antibiotic resistance genes] we see in the clinic," she added.

The researchers said their findings show that cow manure contains "an unprecedented reservoir of [antibiotic resistance] genes" that could move into people.

"This is just the first in a sequence of studies -- starting in the barn, moving to the soil and food on the table, and then ending up in the clinic -- to find out whether these genes have the potential to move in that direction," Handelsman said.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about antibiotic resistance.

SOURCE: American Society for Microbiology, news release, April 22, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=686979

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Research Personnel
Infection
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact