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  Health Highlights: April 16, 2014

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Actress Valerie Harper Says She's Cancer-Free

Valerie Harper says her latest test results show she is cancer-free.

The 74-year-old television star was diagnosed last March with an inoperable brain tumor and told she had just a few months to live. But she received good news a few weeks ago, ABC News reported.

"I'm absolutely cancer-free!" Harper told Closer magazine. "My last scans have been positive, and my doctors are very happy."

She added that her doctor will not use the term "remission," but instead "likes to say, 'I give you a treatment, and it's either responsive or nonresponsive -- and you are having a phenomenal response.'"

Harper said she's feeling much better, now visits the doctor only once every eight weeks, and is taking a "pulse dose" of medication once a week, ABC News reported.

"There may come a time when I'm not feeling good," Harper said. "But then again, that time may never come."

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E-Cigarettes Caused Cancerous Changes in Lung Cells: Study

Nicotine-saturated vapor from an electronic cigarette caused cancerous changes in human lung cells similar to those trigged by tobacco smoke, according to a laboratory study published earlier this year.

However, the authors of the study presented at a January meeting of lung cancer researchers said these findings were preliminary and did not establish a link between e-cigarettes and cancer, The New York Times reported.

E-cigarettes are becoming increasingly popular in the United States and the Food and Drug Administration is considering how to regulate the devices.

The lung cells used in the study were modified to have certain genetic mutations that increase cancer risk and were placed in a liquid that had been exposed for four hours to vapor from an e-cigarette, The Times reported.

The researchers said it wasn't clear which e-cigarette ingredients may have been responsible for the cancer-related changes in the cells.

While the findings do not prove a link between e-cigarettes and cancer, they do highlight the fact that little is known about the long term effects of e-cigarette use or the specific effects of e-cigarette ingredients, said study leader Dr. Steven Dubinett, a professor at the University of California, Los Angeles.

"There is a lot that we don't know about e-cigarettes, and one concern is that some of the substances within e-cigarettes could contribute to negative health effects," he told The Times.

Some experts believe that e-cigarettes are far less likely than tobacco cigarettes to cause cancer because they do not burn tobacco.

Laboratory research can be difficult to apply to people, according to Dr. Neal Benowitz, a nicotine researcher at the University of California, San Francisco.

"Isolated cell systems may respond differently than organs in a person," he told The Times.

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=686891

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Neoplasms
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The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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