bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
All Web sites
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: A J J M A M F J
2013: D N O S A

 
  Other news for:
Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
 Resources from HONselect
Newer Radiation Therapy Treats Prostate Cancer More Quickly: Study
But researchers found less expensive treatment was more likely to lead to urinary complications

By Robert Preidt

WEDNESDAY, March 12, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A newer form of radiation therapy for prostate cancer is faster and less expensive, but it can cause more urinary complications, a new study suggests.

The newer therapy delivers a greater dose of radiation per treatment than standard radiation therapy, which means prostate cancer patients can complete an entire course of treatment in one to two weeks instead of seven to nine weeks.

There have, however, been few studies comparing the costs and side effects of the two methods.

In this study, Yale University researchers looked at data from more than 4,000 Medicare patients aged 66 and older who received either the newer radiation therapy or the standard radiation therapy as primary treatment for prostate cancer.

The average per-patient cost was about $13,600 for the new therapy and $21,000 for the standard therapy. Two years after the start of treatment, patients who received the newer therapy had more side effects -- such as irritation of the urethra, urinary incontinence and urinary obstruction -- than those who received standard radiation therapy.

But even when the costs of treating those complications were included, the overall cost of the newer therapy was still lower than the standard therapy, according to the study, which was published March 10 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

"While these data are by no means definitive, our findings emphasize the need to carefully assess the impact of new cancer treatment technologies in actual practice," senior study author Dr. Cary Gross, a professor of internal medicine at the Yale School of Medicine, said in a university news release.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more about prostate cancer treatment.

SOURCE: Yale University, news release, March 10, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=685670

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Prostate
Therapeutics
Research Personnel
Lead
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact