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  Health Highlights: Feb. 18, 2014

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Saliva Test May Spot Depression Risk in Male Teens

A simple saliva test might one day spot which teenaged boys are most likely to develop major depression later in life, British researchers report.

After testing both boys and girls who had been diagnosed with mild depression, the researchers found that boys with high levels of a stress hormone called cortisol were 14 times more likely to be diagnosed with clinical depression later, according to the Associated Press.

Girls with high cortisol levels were only four times more likely to receive such a diagnosis during the course of the study, the AP reported.

At this point in time, there is no biological way to measure depression risk, the news service reported.

"This is the emergence of a new way of looking at mental illness," study co-author Joe Herbert, of the University of Cambridge, told reporters during a Monday news conference. "You don't have to rely simply on what the patient tells you, but what you can measure inside the patient."

In the study, published online Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, saliva samples were collected from more than 1,800 children aged 12 to 19. The teens were also questioned about depression symptoms, and all were followed for at least three years.

Experts told the AP that male and female hormones might react differently to cortisol, and that might explain the stronger correlation between the hormone and depression risk in males.

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Number of Fertility Treatment Babies in U.S. Increasing

A record number of babies born in the United States in 2012 were conceived using fertility treatment, according to a new study.

In vitro fertilization (IVF) led to the birth 61,740 babies that year, which was 1.5 percent of all births in the nation. There were 2,000 more IVF-associated births in 2012 than in 2011, the Associated Press reported.

The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology study also said that a growing number of women are using one embryo at a time in order to prevent multiple births, which can increase the risk of premature birth and other problems.

Four percent of women younger than 35 used single embryos in 2007, compared with 15 percent in 2012, the AP reported.

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=684990

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Depression
Risk
Saliva
Therapeutics
Hormones
Hydrocortisone
Research Personnel
Embryonic Structures
Women
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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