bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
All Web sites
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: A J J M A M F J
2013: D N O S A

 
  Other news for:
Brain
Sleep Disorders
 Resources from HONselect
Do You Often Recall Dreams? Your Brain Might Be More Active
In French brain-scan study, 'high recallers' remembered dreams five mornings per week

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, Feb. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People who often remember their dreams have high levels of activity in certain areas of the brain, a new study says.

Researchers led by Perrine Ruby, of the Lyon Neuroscience Research Center in France, conducted brain scans on 41 people while they were awake and while they slept. Of the participants, 21 remembered dreams an average of about five mornings per week ("high dream recallers") and 20 remembered dreams only two mornings per month ("low dream recallers").

When asleep and awake, the high dream recallers showed higher levels of activity in the brain's medial prefrontal cortex and temporo-parietal junction, which is an information-processing hub, according to a news release from the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM).

The study was published online Feb. 19 in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology.

Previous research by the same team found that high dream recallers have twice as many periods of wakefulness during the night and that their brains react more to sounds while they're sleeping and awake, compared to low dream recallers.

The increased brain activity in high dream recallers may cause them to wake up more often during sleep and thereby improve their recollection of dreams, Ruby said in the news release. She noted that the "sleeping brain is not capable of memorizing new information; it needs to awaken to be able to do that."

The researchers also said that high dream recallers may have more dreams than low recallers and therefore more dreams to remember.

More information

The National Sleep Foundation has more about dreams and sleep.

SOURCE: French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), news release, Feb. 12, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=684973

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Dreams
Brain
Sleep
Research Personnel
Wakefulness
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact