bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
All Web sites
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: A M F J
2013: D N O S A J J M A

 
  Other news for:
Pain
 Resources from HONselect
FDA Advisers Revisit Heart Risks Posed by Painkillers
Studies suggest naproxen (Aleve) may pose less of a threat

By HealthDay staff

MONDAY, Feb. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Naproxen -- the key pain reliever in Aleve -- seems safer for the heart than other popular anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Advil and Motrin), U.S. health officials say.

And it's possible that labeling will soon reflect that finding.

Advisers to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are meeting Monday and Tuesday to discuss cardiac risks associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, sometimes called NSAIDs.

Millions of people take these medicines, which also include the prescription drug Celebrex, to relieve muscle aches, headaches and pain from arthritis and injuries.

Since 2005, labeling laws have required a heart warning on these anti-inflammatory drugs. That stemmed from Merck's withdrawal of the NSAID Vioxx from the market in 2004 because of a notable increased risk of heart attack among Vioxx users.

But naproxen doesn't seem to carry the same risks as the other NSAIDs, an FDA panel recently concluded after a safety review involving 350,000 people using different pain relievers. The panel posted its findings online last week.

If the FDA does approve a labeling change, that could make Aleve and other naproxen-containing drugs the preferred drug for patients who have a risk of heart problems, Ira Loss, a pharmaceutical analyst with Washington Analysis, told the Associated Press. However, all NSAIDs will still need to warn of risks for internal bleeding and ulceration, Loss said.

The FDA isn't required to follow its advisory panel's recommendations, but it frequently does.

Aspirin, another type of NSAID, isn't a focus of this week's hearings.

More information

The American College of Rheumatology has more about pain relievers.

SOURCES: Feb. 10, 2014, news release, U.S. Food and Drug Administration; Associated Press

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=684730

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Risk
Heart
Pain
Specialty Chemicals and Products
Ibuprofen
Wounds and Injuries
Muscles
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact