bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: O S A J J M A M F J
2013: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Aspirin
Brain
Deafness
Tinnitus
 Resources from HONselect
Aspirin Might Help Treat Brain Tumor Tied to Hearing Loss
Study found the drug slowed growth of noncancerous acoustic neuromas

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, Jan. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Aspirin might slow the growth of a noncancerous type of brain tumor that can lead to hearing loss, ringing in the ears (tinnitus) and even death, according to new research.

For the study, which was published in the February issue of the journal Otology and Neurotology, researchers examined data from nearly 700 people who were diagnosed with vestibular schwannomas (also called acoustic neuromas). There is no approved medication to treat these tumors, which grow on the nerves that connect the brain to the ears, the researchers said.

Current treatment options include surgery or radiation therapy, both of which can cause serious complications, the researchers said.

Their analysis revealed that the rate of tumor growth was slower in patients who took aspirin than in those who didn't take the drug. Age and gender did not affect the findings.

"Our results suggest a potential therapeutic role of aspirin in inhibiting vestibular schwannoma growth," study leader Dr. Konstantina Stankovic, an otologic surgeon and researcher at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, said in an infirmary news release.

Stankovic also is an assistant professor of otology and laryngology at Harvard Medical School, and a faculty member of Harvard's program in speech and hearing bioscience and technology.

The study was funded in part by the U.S. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about vestibular schwannoma.

SOURCE: Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, news release, Jan. 24, 2014

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=684291

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Aspirin
Brain
Neoplasms
Hearing
Brain Neoplasms
Neuroma, Acoustic
Research Personnel
Ear
Neurilemmoma
Neuroma
Therapeutics
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact