bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
All Web sites
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2014: A M F J
2013: D N O S A J J M A

 
  Other news for:
Exercise
 Resources from HONselect
Tips for Safe Winter Workouts
Avoiding hypothermia is crucial, expert says

By Robert Preidt

SATURDAY, Dec. 21, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- If you exercise outdoors during the winter, be sure to do so safely, an expert says.

The major concern for people who exercise in the cold is hypothermia, or too much heat loss, according to Dr. Cedric Bryant, chief science officer at the American Council on Exercise.

He offered the following tips:

  • Dress in layers. This will give allow you to change the amount of insulation that you need during your workout.
  • Cover your head. Your body loses about 50 percent of its heat if your head is uncovered at the freezing mark. Wearing a helmet or hat keeps that heat in and means you can stay outside much longer.
  • Wear gloves. In cold weather, your blood moves from your hands to the center of your body to keep your internal organs warm and protected. Wearing gloves will keep blood flowing to your hands and prevent cold-related tissue damage.
  • Always check the air temperature and wind chill before heading outdoors to exercise and dress appropriately. You're in danger if you have exposed skin when the wind chill (a combined effect of temperature and wind) falls below minus 20 degrees Fahrenheit.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more about cold weather hazards and safety.

SOURCE: American Council on Exercise, news release

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=682840

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Blood
Hypothermia
Head
Head Protective Devices
Tissues
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact